Mortgage Consultant Receives £ 23,000 Payout After She Was Fired For “Constant Moaning”

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A highly trained mortgage consultant won a £ 23,000 payout after her bosses fired her for “constant groaning.”

Helen McMahon complained about how hard she worked and how many hours she worked at Heron Financial Limited in Rickmansworth as heard by the labor court.

She told her bosses that she was “stressed” because she worked more than 48 hours a week, which led to her being fired after two working days.

Mortgage and insurance brokers said she was fired for poor performance, despite having previously rewarded her job with a bottle of champagne.

The judge ruled that she was unfairly fired for her “moaning” and awarded her £ 23,000 in compensation, unpaid sickness benefits and due commissions.

The group heard that Mrs McMahon, who was eligible for commissions to increase her annual salary of £ 27,000, was often able to work 12 hours a day without a lunch break at a firm in Hertfordshire.

Helen McMahon (pictured) complained about how hard she worked and how much time she had to work before hearing a labor court hearing.

Helen McMahon (pictured) complained about how hard she worked and how much time she had to work before hearing a labor court hearing.

The Cambridge court heard that Ms. McMahon had worked for the company for two years, starting June 2017, as a “new construction and mortgage protection advisor.”

The role was to visit apartment buildings to meet with clients who watched the houses for a show about new developments in Chilterns.

In May 2019, she emailed her boss about unpaid commissions that she believed were not reflected in her latest payroll.

Then she had to not work for two weeks due to illness. Returning to work on May 30, 2019, she walked into the office, where, at her request, she met with her boss, Robin Thomas.

The court heard that she raised several issues, including her working hours, which she believed were long, the salary and commissions she received on her May 2019 payroll, and her sickness benefit.

Ms. McMahon told the court, “I told Mr. Thomas that I work more than 48 hours a week, that it bothers me and that I want to somehow shorten my hours.”

She added that the stress “made her feel bad,” and she believes it is her legal right not to work more than 48 hours a week.

Two business days later, on June 4, Mrs. McMahon was asked to enter the office and was greeted by the founder of the company, Warren Harrocks, who told her that she was being fired without any explanation.

Ms. McMahon then sued for unfair and illegal dismissal on the grounds that she was not fired because of productivity issues, but because she expressed concerns about working 48 hours a week.

Heron Financial told the court that Mrs McMahon was fired due to performance issues, despite giving her a bottle of champagne as a reward for her work that year.

Ms McMahon stated that this is a recognition of her “one of the highest conversion rates in the company.”

The Cambridge Tribunal heard that Ms. McMahon worked for Heron Financial Limited (pictured, her office in Rickmansworth) for two years from June 2017 as a

The Cambridge Tribunal heard that Ms. McMahon worked for Heron Financial Limited (pictured, her office in Rickmansworth) for two years from June 2017 as a “New Construction and Mortgage Defense Advisor”.

Mr. Harrocks told the court that he was unaware that Ms. McMahon had raised the issue of working hours with Mr. Thomas.

But Judge Sarah King said that “it was a small business, and the directors regularly discussed issues among themselves.”

A message from Mr. Thomas to one of his colleagues about his relationship with Mrs McMahon said, “There was nothing formal from memory, but if it was a quick conversation, I cannot be 100% sure as she was always moaning.

“In all respects, if she was unhappy, I would point her to myself or to Matt.”

Judge King said: “If anything, it confirms the fact that Mr. Thomas has approached the directors on these issues.

Mr. Harrocks’ own evidence was that … [Mrs McMahon] She valued money very much and was dissatisfied with her salary.

‘This, combined with Mr Thomas’s comments, gives the impression [Mrs McMahon] was considered a person who complained a lot.

“In the light of my findings, it becomes clear that during the meeting on May 30, 2019. [Mrs McMahon] defended a number of legal rights. It seemed to Mr. Thomas that she was “moaning” as she was “always moaning.”

‘It’s clear to me that [Heron Financial] counts [Mrs McMahon] there was a “whiner” – someone who complained.

‘[Heron Financial] not going to admit it fired [Mrs McMahon] for unacceptable reasons, but … in the absence of any other compelling reason … her dismissal was due to her “moaning”.

I believe that Mr. Harrocks was aware of this and that it was the cause or root cause [Mrs McMahon’s] dismissal.

‘I am satisfied [Mrs McMahon] was fired for defending legal rights. This dismissal was unfair as no procedures were followed and there was no just reason for dismissal. [her]… ‘

Mrs McMahon was awarded £ 19,552.33 for unfair dismissal and £ 2,736.38 for unlawful deduction from wages.

She was also awarded £ 586.81 for unpaid commissions and sickness benefits and £ 252.41 for illegal dismissal.

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