It’s no coincidence that these historic LGBTQ shelters are now top-notch real estate – that’s why

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If the real estate industry has a mantra, it’s “location, location, location,” a phrase that even those who are unlikely to read Zillow have heard. However, contrary to popular belief, location isn’t everything; There is another factor that greatly influences the value of a neighborhood or building: history. And while there are a number of important moments – the presidential inauguration, peace treaties and vaccine development, and many others – that have painted the picture of America’s future, June is coming a little differently.

While Greenwich Village has long been a favorite area for artists and others who aspired to a bohemian lifestyle in New York City, it was an event that happened in the wee hours of June 28, 1969, when New York’s queer community made history. … Although they were expensive, the six-day Stonewall riots has become a powerful and powerful catalyst for the protection of gay rights both in the United States and abroad. Another result of a revolutionary uprising? Renewed interest (and everlasting obsession) with the quaint and charming New York City countryside. And today, so many neighborhoods and venues such as the Stonewall Inn, which are known to embrace the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ +) community, have become prime real estate for almost everyone – gay or not.

In the wee hours of June 28, 1969, the New York queer community made history in Greenwich Village. Stonewall Inn… Although they were expensive, the six-day Stonewall riots has become a powerful and powerful catalyst for the protection of gay rights both in the United States and abroad. Another result of a revolutionary uprising? A timeless obsession with the quaint and charming New York City countryside. And today, so many neighborhoods and venues such as the Stonewall Inn, which are known to embrace the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ +) community, have become prime real estate for almost everyone – gay or not.

The famous Stonewall Hotel in New York.

Oleg Albinsky

Prior to 1980, homosexuality, which was actually a politically correct way to deal with homosexuality without having to delve into it, was a Class A offense in New York City like assault or theft, and was punishable by up to six months in the state. jail. Thus, the Stonewall Inn, one of the city’s only “secret” gay clubs where dancing is allowed, has become a haven of sorts for the city’s gay community. However, visitors weren’t entirely free: the club, which operated illegally without a liquor license, was raided almost weekly.

However, the NYPD and the Genovese, the mafia family that owned the Stonewall Hotel, had an arrangement: the mafia paid the dirty cops of the Sixth Police Station, and in response, the police gave the bar owners their heads … before the raids, giving the Genoese a few hours. to hide alcohol and hide illegal “sodomites”. However, on June 28, 1969, there was no warning, and officers with guns and truncheons chained to their thighs rushed into the bar, brutally dragging out transvestites, underage fugitives, locking up Wall Street residents and stuffing them into police vans. Within minutes, an angry crowd of hundreds had gathered outside the Christopher Street establishment, ready to fight. The protests lasted six days, turning the humble brick building and its surroundings into an architectural legend.

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